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The Rise
  • Author : Sarah Lewis
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN : 9781451629255
  • Reader Reviews : 4
  • Genre : Psychology
  • From celebrated art historian, curator, and teacher Sarah Lewis, a fascinating examination of how our most iconic creative endeavors—from innovation to the arts—are not achievements but conversions, corrections after failed attempts. The gift of failure is a riddle: it will always be both the void and the start of infinite possibility. The Rise—part investigation into a psychological mystery, part an argument about creativity and art, and part a soulful celebration of the determination and courage of the human spirit—makes the case that many of the world’s greatest achievements have come from understanding the central importance of failure. Written over the course of four years, this exquisite biography of an idea is about the improbable foundations of a creative human endeavor. Each chapter focuses on the inestimable value of often ignored ideas—the power of surrender, how play is essential for innovation, the “near win” can help propel you on the road to mastery, the importance of grit and creative practice. The Rise shares narratives about figures past and present that range from choreographers, writers, painters, inventors, and entrepreneurs; Frederick Douglass, Samuel F.B. Morse, Diane Arbus, and J.K. Rowling, for example, feature alongside choreographer Paul Taylor, Nobel Prize–winning physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, and Arctic explorer Ben Saunders. With valuable lessons for pedagogy and parenting, for innovation and discovery, and for self-direction and creativity, The Rise “gives the old chestnut ‘If at first you don’t succeed…’ a jolt of adrenaline” (Elle).

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    The Rise of the Arabic Book
  • Author : Beatrice Gruendler
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Pages : 224
  • ISBN : 9780674250260
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Literary Criticism
  • The little-known story of the sophisticated and vibrant Arabic book culture that flourished during the Middle Ages. During the thirteenth century, Europe’s largest library owned fewer than 2,000 volumes. Libraries in the Arab world at the time had exponentially larger collections. Five libraries in Baghdad alone held between 200,000 and 1,000,000 books each, including multiple copies of standard works so that their many patrons could enjoy simultaneous access. How did the Arabic codex become so popular during the Middle Ages, even as the well-established form languished in Europe? Beatrice Gruendler’s The Rise of the Arabic Book answers this question through in-depth stories of bookmakers and book collectors, stationers and librarians, scholars and poets of the ninth century. The history of the book has been written with an outsize focus on Europe. The role books played in shaping the great literary cultures of the world beyond the West has been less known—until now. An internationally renowned expert in classical Arabic literature, Gruendler corrects this oversight and takes us into the rich literary milieu of early Arabic letters.

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    The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement: The Battle for Control of the Law
  • Author : Steven M. Teles
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 069114625X
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Law
  • Starting in the 1970s, conservatives learned that electoral victory did not easily convert into a reversal of important liberal accomplishments, especially in the law. As a result, conservatives' mobilizing efforts increasingly turned to law schools, professional networks, public interest groups, and the judiciary--areas traditionally controlled by liberals. Drawing from internal documents, as well as interviews with key conservative figures, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement examines this sometimes fitful, and still only partially successful, conservative challenge to liberal domination of the law and American legal institutions. Unlike accounts that depict the conservatives as fiendishly skilled, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement reveals the formidable challenges that conservatives faced in competing with legal liberalism. Steven Teles explores how conservative mobilization was shaped by the legal profession, the legacy of the liberal movement, and the difficulties in matching strategic opportunities with effective organizational responses. He explains how foundations and groups promoting conservative ideas built a network designed to dislodge legal liberalism from American elite institutions. And he portrays the reality, not of a grand strategy masterfully pursued, but of individuals and political entrepreneurs learning from trial and error. Using previously unavailable materials from the Olin Foundation, Federalist Society, Center for Individual Rights, Institute for Justice, and Law and Economics Center, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement provides an unprecedented look at the inner life of the conservative movement. Lawyers, historians, sociologists, political scientists, and activists seeking to learn from the conservative experience in the law will find it compelling reading.

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    The Reckoning
  • Author : Jacob Soll
  • Publisher : Basic Books (AZ)
  • Pages : 314
  • ISBN : 9780465031528
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : History
  • An award-winning historian presents a wide-ranging history of accounting, discussing how basic auditing and double-entry bookkeeping have shaped kingdoms and empires as well as how misuse of this system caused the 1929 Crash and the 2008 financial crisis. 30,000 first printing.

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    Last Call
  • Author : Daniel Okrent
  • Publisher : Scribner
  • Pages : 480
  • ISBN : 074327704X
  • Reader Reviews : 35
  • Genre : History
  • A brilliant, authoritative, and fascinating history of America’s most puzzling era, the years 1920 to 1933, when the US Constitution was amended to restrict one of America’s favorite pastimes: drinking alcoholic beverages. From its start, America has been awash in drink. The sailing vessel that brought John Winthrop to the shores of the New World in 1630 carried more beer than water. By the 1820s, liquor flowed so plentifully it was cheaper than tea. That Americans would ever agree to relinquish their booze was as improbable as it was astonishing. Yet we did, and Last Call is Daniel Okrent’s dazzling explanation of why we did it, what life under Prohibition was like, and how such an unprecedented degree of government interference in the private lives of Americans changed the country forever. Writing with both wit and historical acuity, Okrent reveals how Prohibition marked a confluence of diverse forces: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town, native-stock Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants of the large cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other unlikely factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax. Through it all, Americans kept drinking, going to remarkably creative lengths to smuggle, sell, conceal, and convivially (and sometimes fatally) imbibe their favorite intoxicants. Last Call is peopled with vivid characters of an astonishing variety: Susan B. Anthony and Billy Sunday, William Jennings Bryan and bootlegger Sam Bronfman, Pierre S. du Pont and H. L. Mencken, Meyer Lansky and the incredible—if long-forgotten—federal official Mabel Walker Willebrandt, who throughout the twenties was the most powerful woman in the country. (Perhaps most surprising of all is Okrent’s account of Joseph P. Kennedy’s legendary, and long-misunderstood, role in the liquor business.) It’s a book rich with stories from nearly all parts of the country. Okrent’s narrative runs through smoky Manhattan speakeasies, where relations between the sexes were changed forever; California vineyards busily producing “sacramental” wine; New England fishing communities that gave up fishing for the more lucrative rum-running business; and in Washington, the halls of Congress itself, where politicians who had voted for Prohibition drank openly and without apology. Last Call is capacious, meticulous, and thrillingly told. It stands as the most complete history of Prohibition ever written and confirms Daniel Okrent’s rank as a major American writer.

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    The Rise of Anthropological Theory
  • Author : Marvin Harris
  • Publisher : Rowman Altamira
  • Pages : 824
  • ISBN : 0759101337
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : Social Science
  • The best known, most often cited history of anthropological theory is finally available in paperback! First published in 1968, Harris's book has been cited in over 1,000 works and is one of the key documents explaining cultural materialism, the theory associated with Harris's work. This updated edition included the complete 1968 text plus a new introduction by Maxine Margolis, which discusses the impact of the book and highlights some of the major trends in anthropological theory since its original publication. RAT, as it is affectionately known to three decades of graduate students, comprehensively traces the history of anthropology and anthropological theory, culminating in a strong argument for the use of a scientific, behaviorally-based, etic approach to the understanding of human culture known as cultural materialism. Despite its popularity and influence on anthropological thinking, RAT has never been available in paperback_until now. It is an essential volume for the library of all anthropologists, their graduate students, and other theorists in the social sciences.

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    The Rise of the Novel
  • Author : Ian Watt
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Pages : 340
  • ISBN : 9780520230699
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Literary Criticism
  • A classic description of the interworkings of social conditions changing attitudes, and literary practices during the period when the novel emerged as the dominant literary form of the individualist era.

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    Gods and Kings
  • Author : Dana Thomas
  • Publisher : Penguin Books
  • Pages : 434
  • ISBN : 9780143128397
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • Analyzes the ends of two preeminent fashion designers to demonstrate how they were casualties of the war between art and commerce, chronicling their rise and achievements while sharing insights into how art has suffered at the hands of economic demands.

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    The Rise of Animals
  • Author : Mikhail A. Fedonkin,James G. Gehling,Kathleen Grey,Guy M. Narbonne,Patricia Vickers-Rich
  • Publisher : JHU Press
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 0801886791
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Science
  • An essential resource for paleontologists, biologists, geologists, and teachers, The Rise of Animals is the best single reference on one of earth's most significant events.

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    Bang Your Head
  • Author : David Konow
  • Publisher : Crown
  • Pages : 498
  • ISBN : 9780609807323
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Music
  • “Bang your head! Metal Health’ll drive you mad!” — Quiet Riot Like an episode of VH1’s Behind the Music on steroids, Bang Your Head is an epic history of every band and every performer that has proudly worn the Heavy Metal badge. Whether headbanging is your guilty pleasure or you firmly believe that this much-maligned genre has never received the respect it deserves, Bang Your Head is a must-read that pays homage to a music that’s impossible to ignore, especially when being blasted through a sixteen-inch woofer. Charting the genesis of early metal with bands like Black Sabbath and Iron Maiden; the rise of metal to the top of the Billboard charts and heavy MTV rotation featuring the likes of Def Leppard and Metallica; hitting its critical peak with bands like Guns N’ Roses; disgrace during the “hair metal” ’80s; and a demise fueled by the explosion of the Seattle grunge scene and the “alternative” revolution, Bang Your Head is as funny as it is informative and proves once and for all that there is more to metal than sin, sex, and spandex. To write this exhaustive history, David Konow spent three years interviewing the bands, wives, girlfriends, ex-wives, groupies, managers, record company execs, and anyone who was or is a part of the metal scene, including many of the band guys often better known for their escapades and bad behavior than for their musicianship. Nothing is left unsaid in this jaw-dropping, funny, and entertaining chronicle of power ballads, outrageous outfits, big hair, bigger egos, and testosterone-drenched debauchery.

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    The Rise of the Wyrm Lord
  • Author : Wayne Thomas Batson
  • Publisher : Thomas Nelson Inc
  • Pages : 386
  • ISBN : 9781400322657
  • Reader Reviews : 125
  • Genre : Juvenile Fiction
  • Aidan's new friend Antoinette is called to the Realm, but when she arrives to rescue Robby through his Glimpse-twin, the place is in turmoil and she must decide whether to stay loyal to the one true king or join the evil side.

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    The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier, 1204-1760
  • Author : Richard M. Eaton
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Pages : 387
  • ISBN : 9780520205079
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : History
  • Eaton ranges over all the important aspects of that community's history, whether political and social, or cultural and religious...This study must rank among the finest contributions to South Asian scholarship to appear for some while.

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    The Rise and Fall of the Jewish Gangster in America
  • Author : Albert Fried
  • Publisher : N.a
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : UOM:39015032874482
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : History
  • This book tracks the rise and fall of an underworld culture that bred some of America's greatest racketeers, bootleggers, gamblers, and professional killers, examining the careers of such high-profile figures as Meyer Lansky and Benjamin Bugsy Siegel.

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    The Rise of Liberal Religion
  • Author : Matthew Hedstrom
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 289
  • ISBN : 9780195374490
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : History
  • Winner of the Frank S. and Elizabeth D. Brewer Best First Book Prize of the American Society of Church History Named a Society for U. S. Intellectual History Notable Title in American Intellectual History The story of liberal religion in the twentieth century, Matthew S. Hedstrom contends, is a story of cultural ascendency. This may come as a surprise-most scholarship in American religious history, after all, equates the numerical decline of the Protestant mainline with the failure of religious liberalism. Yet a look beyond the pews, into the wider culture, reveals a more complex and fascinating story, one Hedstrom tells in The Rise of Liberal Religion. Hedstrom attends especially to the critically important yet little-studied arena of religious book culture-particularly the religious middlebrow of mid-century-as the site where religious liberalism was most effectively popularized. By looking at book weeks, book clubs, public libraries, new publishing enterprises, key authors and bestsellers, wartime reading programs, and fan mail, among other sources, Hedstrom is able to provide a rich, on-the-ground account of the men, women, and organizations that drove religious liberalism's cultural rise in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. Critically, by the post-WWII period the religious middlebrow had expanded beyond its Protestant roots, using mystical and psychological spirituality as a platform for interreligious exchange. This compelling history of religion and book culture not only shows how reading and book buying were critical twentieth-century religious practices, but also provides a model for thinking about the relationship of religion to consumer culture more broadly. In this way, The Rise of Liberal Religion offers both innovative cultural history and new ways of seeing the imprint of liberal religion in our own times.

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    Suburban Nation
  • Author : Andres Duany,Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk,Jeff Speck
  • Publisher : North Point Press
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN : 0865477507
  • Reader Reviews : 5
  • Genre : Social Science
  • For a decade, Suburban Nation has given voice to a growing movement in North America to put an end to suburban sprawl and replace the last century's automobile-based settlement patterns with a return to more traditional planning. Founders of the Congress for the New Urbanism, Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk are at the forefront of the movement, and even their critics, such as Fred Barnes in The Weekly Standard, recognized that "Suburban Nation is likely to become this movement's bible." A lively lament about the failures of postwar planning, this is also that rare book that offers solutions: "an essential handbook" (San Francisco Chronicle). This tenth anniversary edition includes a new preface by the authors.

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    The Rise of the Image, the Fall of the Word
  • Author : Mitchell Stephens,Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication Mitchell Stephens
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 273
  • ISBN : 9780195098297
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Drawing examples from the history of photography, film, television, and the computer, a professor of journalism and mass communication explores how the visual technology of the future may increase, rather than lessen, the sophistication of human thought. UP.

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    The Big Rich
  • Author : Bryan Burrough
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Pages : 482
  • ISBN : 9780143116820
  • Reader Reviews : 17
  • Genre : History
  • “Full of schadenfreude and speculation—and solid, timely history too.” —Kirkus Reviews “This is a portrait of capitalism as white-knuckle risk taking, yielding fruitful discoveries for the fathers, but only sterile speculation for the sons—a story that resonates with today's economic upheaval.” —Publishers Weekly “What's not to enjoy about a book full of monstrous egos, unimaginable sums of money, and the punishment of greed and shortsightedness?” —The Economist Phenomenal reviews and sales greeted the hardcover publication of The Big Rich, New York Times bestselling author Bryan Burrough's spellbinding chronicle of Texas oil. Weaving together the multigenerational sagas of the industry's four wealthiest families, Burrough brings to life the men known in their day as the Big Four: Roy Cullen, H. L. Hunt, Clint Murchison, and Sid Richardson, all swaggering Texas oil tycoons who owned sprawling ranches and mingled with presidents and Hollywood stars. Seamlessly charting their collective rise and fall, The Big Rich is a hugely entertaining account that only a writer with Burrough's abilities-and Texas upbringing-could have written.

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    The Rise
  • Author : Danette May
  • Publisher : Hay House
  • Pages : 209
  • ISBN : 9781401956189
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : SELF-HELP
  • "Popular health and fitness expert Danette May has helped millions of people to exercise, lose weight, and achieve their workout goals. In The Rise, she chronicles her own Rise to discovering that the life she was living wasn't the one she was meant form. May had to shed old ways of thinking and being held back, and learn new ways to allow herself to expand beyond what she thought was possible. In this memoir of perseverance, raw vulnerability and truth-telling, May shares her emotional journey through the loss of her son, a divorce, financial ruin, self-hate, and single motherhood, to running her dream company, discovering radical self-love, marrying the man of her dreams, and living a life of unbridled happiness"--

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    From the Ground Up
  • Author : Luke W. Cole,Sheila R. Foster
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Pages : 260
  • ISBN : 0814715370
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : Law
  • Presents case studies of grassroots activism for environmental justice, highlighting struggles against environmental hazards, toxic waste dumps, and polluting factories which often impact low-income and minority communities.

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    The Rise of the Scientist-Bureaucrat
  • Author : Jose Luis Perez Velazquez
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Pages : 104
  • ISBN : 9783030123260
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Science
  • "Perez Velazquez has written a little gem that I advise reading to anyone persuing a scientific career, as well as for the general public interested in the sociological aspects of science. It alerts the reader about the rise of a new type of scientist, buried in bureaucracy and financial issues. In contrast to past generations, this "new scientist" is sadly left with minimal time to dedicate to creative work. It studies the consequences of this state of affairs, the problems associated with peer reviewing, the dilemma of funding innovative research, the nature of corporate academic culture and the trivialization of scientific achievement by grant agencies and universities. It also provides possible solutions for these problems. All this is magnificently exemplified and documented, including personal experiences from the author and a touch of humor illustrated in the accompanying cartoons. Despite the humor, it is a serious piece of work that would also be useful for the conscientious academic worried about the difficulties of the current research scene." Marina Frantseva, MD, PhD Jose Luis Perez Velazquez is a Spanish biochemist/biophysicist. He has a degree in Biochemistry and a PhD in Molecular Physiology & Biophysics. His research activities are mainly in the fields of the brain-behaviour relation at a high level of description, seeking principles of biological organisation. He worked as a senior scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and was Professor at the University of Toronto, where he taught a graduate course on consciousness and self-awareness, which derived in part from his book The Brain-Behaviour Continuum (World Scientific). He also edited the book Coordinated Activity in the Brain (Springer), and edited special issues for The Journal of Biological Physics, Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience and Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. Currently he is a Research Scholar at the Ronin Institute, where he continues to investigate a possible global principle, a scheme that combines theoretical studies and experimental observations, aimed at conceptualizing how consciousness arises from the organization of matter.

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    The Rise of Magicks
  • Author : Nora Roberts
  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Pages : 464
  • ISBN : 9781250123060
  • Reader Reviews : 9
  • Genre : Fiction
  • The #1 New York Times bestselling author of Year One and Of Blood and Bone concludes her stunning new trilogy praised as “A match for end-of-the-world classics like Stephen King’s The Stand.” After the sickness known as the Doom destroyed civilization, magick has become commonplace, and Fallon Swift has spent her young years learning its ways. Fallon cannot live in peace until she frees those who have been preyed upon by the government or the fanatical Purity Warriors, endlessly hunted or locked up in laboratories, brutalized for years on end. She is determined to save even those who have been complicit with this evil out of fear or weakness—if, indeed, they can be saved. Strengthened by the bond she shares with her fellow warrior, Duncan, Fallon has already succeeded in rescuing countless shifters and elves and ordinary humans. Now she must help them heal—and rediscover the light and faith within themselves. For although from the time of her birth, she has been The One, she is still only one. And as she faces down an old nemesis, sets her sights on the enemy’s stronghold, and pursues her destiny—to finally restore the mystical shield that once protected them all—she will need an army behind her...

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    The Rise and Fall of Dodgertown
  • Author : Rody Johnson
  • Publisher : N.a
  • Pages : 302
  • ISBN : 081303194X
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Sports & Recreation
  • Ironically, the last year of Dodgertown will mark the sixtieth anniversary of the team's relationship with Vero Beach, a sleepy beach town a couple of hours north of Miami. Since 1948, when Branch Rickey first brought his team to a former naval air station for training (the players slept in barracks), the Dodgers have practiced fundamentals in a bucolic setting. Featuring roofless dugouts, a grassy berm surrounding the outfield, and intimate seating for 6,400, Holman Stadium has been home to the Dodgers longer than even famed Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. Granted special access to the team's archives and personal interviews with players, management, and staff, Rody Johnson offers a fascinating and remarkable history of the sometimes rocky relationship between the city and the team. Beginning with the signing of Jackie Robinson in 1946 and ending with the close of spring training in 2007, The Rise and Fall of Dodgertown traces the changes in baseball and society for more than a half century. It is a story of community, passion, and the beauty of an American sport.

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    The Rise And Fall of British Naval Mastery
  • Author : Paul Kennedy
  • Publisher : National Geographic Books
  • Pages : 0
  • ISBN : 9780141983820
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : History
  • Paul Kennedy's classic naval history, now updated with a new introduction by the author This acclaimed book traces Britain's rise and fall as a sea power from the Tudors to the present day. Challenging the traditional view that the British are natural 'sons of the waves', he suggests instead that the country's fortunes as a significant maritime force have always been bound up with its economic growth. In doing so, he contributes significantly to the centuries-long debate between 'continental' and 'maritime' schools of strategy over Britain's policy in times of war. Setting British naval history within a framework of national, international, economic, political and strategic considerations, he offers a fresh approach to one of the central questions in British history. A new introduction extends his analysis into the twenty-first century and reflects on current American and Chinese ambitions for naval mastery. 'Excellent and stimulating' Correlli Barnett 'The first scholar to have set the sweep of British Naval history against the background of economic history' Michael Howard, Sunday Times 'By far the best study that has ever been done on the subject ... a sparkling and apt quotation on practically every page' Daniel A. Baugh, International History Review 'The best single-volume study of Britain and her naval past now available to us' Jon Sumida, Journal of Modern History

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    A Time to Rise
  • Author : Rene Ciria Cruz,Cindy Domingo,Bruce Occena
  • Publisher : University of Washington Press
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 9780295742038
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Social Science
  • A Time to Rise is an intimate look into the workings of the KDP, the only revolutionary organization that emerged in the Filipino American community during the politically turbulent 1970s and �80s. Overcoming cultural and class differences, members of the KDP banded together in a single national organization to mobilize their community into civil rights and antiwar movements in the United States and in the fight for democracy and national liberation in the Philippines and elsewhere. These personal accounts document recruitment, organizing, and training in the KDP. More than two-thirds of the stories are by women, reflecting the powerful role they played in the organization and its leadership. Also included are chapters on the struggle for justice for murdered KDP and union leaders Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes. These memoirs offer political insights and inspiring examples of personal courage that will resonate today.

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    The Rise and Fall of Modern Black Leadership
  • Author : H. Viscount Nelson
  • Publisher : University Press of Amer
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : UOM:39015056680567
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Political Science
  • The Rise and Fall of Modern Black Leadership examines the leaders and evolving leadership patterns from 1890 to 2000. The reader will learn how the larger society impinged on African Americans during the twentieth century and ascertain why contemporary black leaders no longer serve their race.

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    Iron Kingdom
  • Author : Christopher Clark
  • Publisher : National Geographic Books
  • Pages : 0
  • ISBN : 9780140293340
  • Reader Reviews : 15
  • Genre : History
  • Winner of the Wolfson History Prize, Christopher Clark's Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia 1600-1947 is a compelling account of a country that played a pivotal role in Europe's fortunes and fundamentally shaped our world. Prussia began as a medieval backwater, but transformed itself into a major European power and the force behind the creation of the German empire, until it was finally abolished by the Allies after the Second World War. With great flair and authority, Christopher Clark describes Prussia's great battles, dynastic marriages and astonishing reversals of fortune, its brilliant and charismatic leaders from the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg to Bismarck and Frederick the Great, the military machine and the progressive, enlightened values on which it was built. 'Fascinating ... masterly ... littered with intriguing detail and wry observation' Richard Overy, Daily Telegraph 'A terrific book ... the definitive history of this much-maligned state' Daily Telegraph Books of the Year 'You couldn't have the triumph and the tragedy of Prussia better told' Observer 'A magisterial history of Europe's only extinct power' Financial Times 'Exemplary ... an illuminating, profoundly satisfying work of history' The New York Times Christopher Clark is a lecturer in Modern European History at St Catharine's College, University of Cambridge. He is also the author of Kaiser Wilhelm II: A Life in Power.

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    The Rise and Fall of OPEC in the Twentieth Century
  • Author : Giuliano Garavini
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
  • Pages : 445
  • ISBN : 9780198832836
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Business & Economics
  • The most comprehensive history of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and of its members, this study takes the reader from the formation of the first petrostate in the world, Venezuela, in the late 1920s, to the global ascent of petrostates and OPEC during the 1970s, to their crisis in the late-1980s and early- 1990s.

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    The Rise and Fall of American Growth
  • Author : Robert J. Gordon
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Pages : 784
  • ISBN : 9781400888955
  • Reader Reviews : 3
  • Genre : Business & Economics
  • How America's high standard of living came to be and why future growth is under threat In the century after the Civil War, an economic revolution improved the American standard of living in ways previously unimaginable. Electric lighting, indoor plumbing, motor vehicles, air travel, and television transformed households and workplaces. But has that era of unprecedented growth come to an end? Weaving together a vivid narrative, historical anecdotes, and economic analysis, The Rise and Fall of American Growth challenges the view that economic growth will continue unabated, and demonstrates that the life-altering scale of innovations between 1870 and 1970 cannot be repeated. Robert Gordon contends that the nation's productivity growth will be further held back by the headwinds of rising inequality, stagnating education, an aging population, and the rising debt of college students and the federal government, and that we must find new solutions. A critical voice in the most pressing debates of our time, The Rise and Fall of American Growth is at once a tribute to a century of radical change and a harbinger of tougher times to come.

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    Lady Q
  • Author : Reymundo Sanchez,Sonia Rodriguez
  • Publisher : Chicago Review Press
  • Pages : 290
  • ISBN : 9781569762851
  • Reader Reviews : 5
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • Looks at the life of a member of Chicago's Puerto Rican gang the Latin Queens, the female counterpoint of the Latin Kings, and details the years of sexual abuse that began at the age of five and the consequences of breaking the gang's code of silence when she appeared on Oprah Winfrey's local talk show.

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    Forget the Alamo
  • Author : Bryan Burrough,Chris Tomlinson,Jason Stanford
  • Publisher : National Geographic Books
  • Pages : 0
  • ISBN : 9781984880093
  • Reader Reviews : 3
  • Genre : History
  • A New York Times bestseller! “Lively and absorbing. . ." — The New York Times Book Review "Engrossing." —Wall Street Journal “Entertaining and well-researched . . . ” —Houston Chronicle Three noted Texan writers combine forces to tell the real story of the Alamo, dispelling the myths, exploring why they had their day for so long, and explaining why the ugly fight about its meaning is now coming to a head. Every nation needs its creation myth, and since Texas was a nation before it was a state, it's no surprise that its myths bite deep. There's no piece of history more important to Texans than the Battle of the Alamo, when Davy Crockett and a band of rebels went down in a blaze of glory fighting for independence from Mexico, losing the battle but setting Texas up to win the war. However, that version of events, as Forget the Alamo definitively shows, owes more to fantasy than reality. Just as the site of the Alamo was left in ruins for decades, its story was forgotten and twisted over time, with the contributions of Tejanos--Texans of Mexican origin, who fought alongside the Anglo rebels--scrubbed from the record, and the origin of the conflict over Mexico's push to abolish slavery papered over. Forget the Alamo provocatively explains the true story of the battle against the backdrop of Texas's struggle for independence, then shows how the sausage of myth got made in the Jim Crow South of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. As uncomfortable as it may be to hear for some, celebrating the Alamo has long had an echo of celebrating whiteness. In the past forty-some years, waves of revisionists have come at this topic, and at times have made real progress toward a more nuanced and inclusive story that doesn't alienate anyone. But we are not living in one of those times; the fight over the Alamo's meaning has become more pitched than ever in the past few years, even violent, as Texas's future begins to look more and more different from its past. It's the perfect time for a wise and generous-spirited book that shines the bright light of the truth into a place that's gotten awfully dark.

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    The Rise: Kobe Bryant and the Pursuit of Immortality
  • Author : Mike Sielski
  • Publisher : Macmillan
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : 9781761260254
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • Kobe Bryant's death in January 2020 did more than rattle the worlds of sports and celebrity. It took the tragedy of that helicopter crash to reveal the full breadth and depth of Kobe's influence, and by tracing and telling the oft-forgotten and lesser-known story of his early life, The Rise promises to provide an unparalleled insight into Kobe. In The Rise, readers will travel from the cracked concrete basketball courts of Philadelphia in the 1960s and '70s-where Kobe's father, Joe, became a playground, college, and professional standout-to the majesty and isolation of Europe, where Kobe spent his formative years, to the leafy suburbs of Lower Merion, where Kobe's legend was born. The story will culminate with his leading Lower Merion to the 1995-96 Pennsylvania state championship-a true underdog run for a team with just one star player, Kobe-and with the 1996 NBA draft, where Kobe's dream of playing pro basketball culminated with his acquisition by the Los Angeles Lakers. In researching and writing The Rise, Mike Sielski had a terrific advantage over other writers who have attempted to chronicle Kobe's life: access to a series of never-before-released interviews with him during his senior season and early days in the NBA. For a quarter-century, these tapes and transcripts preserved Kobe's thoughts, dreams, and goals from his teenage years, and they contained insights into him and told stories about him that have never been revealed before.

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    The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt
  • Author : Edmund Morris
  • Publisher : Modern Library
  • Pages : 960
  • ISBN : 9780307777829
  • Reader Reviews : 1483
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE AND THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD • Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time “A towering biography . . . a brilliant chronicle.”—Time This classic biography is the story of seven men—a naturalist, a writer, a lover, a hunter, a ranchman, a soldier, and a politician—who merged at age forty-two to become the youngest President in history. The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt begins at the apex of his international prestige. That was on New Year’s Day, 1907, when TR, who had just won the Nobel Peace Prize, threw open the doors of the White House to the American people and shook 8,150 hands. One visitor remarked afterward, “You go to the White House, you shake hands with Roosevelt and hear him talk—and then you go home to wring the personality out of your clothes.” The rest of this book tells the story of TR’s irresistible rise to power. During the years 1858–1901, Theodore Roosevelt transformed himself from a frail, asthmatic boy into a full-blooded man. Fresh out of Harvard, he simultaneously published a distinguished work of naval history and became the fist-swinging leader of a Republican insurgency in the New York State Assembly. He chased thieves across the Badlands of North Dakota with a copy of Anna Karenina in one hand and a Winchester rifle in the other. Married to his childhood sweetheart in 1886, he became the country squire of Sagamore Hill on Long Island, a flamboyant civil service reformer in Washington, D.C., and a night-stalking police commissioner in New York City. As assistant secretary of the navy, he almost single-handedly brought about the Spanish-American War. After leading “Roosevelt’s Rough Riders” in the famous charge up San Juan Hill, Cuba, he returned home a military hero, and was rewarded with the governorship of New York. In what he called his “spare hours” he fathered six children and wrote fourteen books. By 1901, the man Senator Mark Hanna called “that damned cowboy” was vice president. Seven months later, an assassin’s bullet gave TR the national leadership he had always craved. His is a story so prodigal in its variety, so surprising in its turns of fate, that previous biographers have treated it as a series of haphazard episodes. This book, the only full study of TR’s pre-presidential years, shows that he was an inevitable chief executive. “It was as if he were subconsciously aware that he was a man of many selves,” the author writes, “and set about developing each one in turn, knowing that one day he would be President of all the people.”

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    At the Dark End of the Street
  • Author : Danielle L. McGuire
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Pages : 418
  • ISBN : 9780307389244
  • Reader Reviews : 1
  • Genre : History
  • Here is the courageous, groundbreaking story of Rosa Parks and Recy Taylor—a story that reinterprets the history of America's civil rights movement in terms of the sexual violence committed against Black women by white men. "An important step to finally facing the terrible legacies of race and gender in this country.” —The Washington Post Rosa Parks was often described as a sweet and reticent elderly woman whose tired feet caused her to defy segregation on Montgomery’s city buses, and whose supposedly solitary, spontaneous act sparked the 1955 bus boycott that gave birth to the civil rights movement. The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really lay beneath the 1955 boycott is far different from anything previously written. In this groundbreaking and important book, Danielle McGuire writes about the rape in 1944 of a twenty-four-year-old mother and sharecropper, Recy Taylor, who strolled toward home after an evening of singing and praying at the Rock Hill Holiness Church in Abbeville, Alabama. Seven white men, armed with knives and shotguns, ordered the young woman into their green Chevrolet, raped her, and left her for dead. The president of the local NAACP branch office sent his best investigator and organizer—Rosa Parks—to Abbeville. In taking on this case, Parks launched a movement that exposed a ritualized history of sexual assault against Black women and added fire to the growing call for change.

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    The Rise of Nuclear Fear
  • Author : Spencer R. Weart
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Pages : 381
  • ISBN : 9780674065062
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : History
  • After a tsunami destroyed the cooling system at Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, triggering a meltdown, protesters around the world challenged the use of nuclear power. Germany announced it would close its plants by 2022. Although the ills of fossil fuels are better understood than ever, the threat of climate change has never aroused the same visceral dread or swift action. Spencer Weart dissects this paradox, demonstrating that a powerful web of images surrounding nuclear energy holds us captive, allowing fear, rather than facts, to drive our thinking and public policy.Building on his classic, Nuclear Fear, Weart follows nuclear imagery from its origins in the symbolism of medieval alchemy to its appearance in film and fiction. Long before nuclear fission was discovered, fantasies of the destroyed planet, the transforming ray, and the white city of the future took root in the popular imagination. At the turn of the twentieth century when limited facts about radioactivity became known, they produced a blurred picture upon which scientists and the public projected their hopes and fears. These fears were magnified during the Cold War, when mushroom clouds no longer needed to be imagined; they appeared on the evening news. Weart examines nuclear anxiety in sources as diverse as Alain Resnais's film Hiroshima Mon Amour, Cormac McCarthy's novel The Road, and the television show The Simpsons.Recognizing how much we remain in thrall to these setpieces of the imagination, Weart hopes, will help us resist manipulation from both sides of the nuclear debate.

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    Benching Jim Crow
  • Author : Charles H. Martin
  • Publisher : University of Illinois Press
  • Pages : 418
  • ISBN : 9780252077500
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Social Science
  • "Historians, sports scholars, and students will refer to Benching Jim Crow for many years to come as the standard source on the integration of intercollegiate sport."ùMark S. Dyreson, author of Making the American Team: Sport, Culture, and the Olympic Experience --

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    The Rise of Yahwism
  • Author : Johannes Cornelis Moor
  • Publisher : Peeters Pub & Booksellers
  • Pages : 480
  • ISBN : UOM:39015059575731
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Religion
  • Read and download full book The Rise of Yahwism

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    The Third Wave
  • Author : Steve Case
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN : 9781501132599
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • Steve Case, co-founder of America Online (AOL) and one of America's most accomplished entrepreneurs, shares a roadmap for how anyone can succeed in a world of rapidly changing technology. We are entering, he explains, a new paradigm called the "Third Wave" of the Internet. The first wave saw AOL and other companies lay the foundation for consumers to connect to the Internet. The second wave saw companies like Google and Facebook build on top of the Internet to create search and social networking capabilities, while apps like Snapchat and Instagram leverage the smartphone revolution. Now, Case argues, we're entering the Third Wave: a period in which entrepreneurs will vastly transform major "real world" sectors like health, education, transportation, energy, and food-and in the process change the way we live our daily lives.

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    The Rise of American Research Universities
  • Author : Holland McTyeier Professor of History Hugh Davis Graham,Hugh Davis Graham,Nancy Diamond
  • Publisher : JHU Press
  • Pages : 334
  • ISBN : 0801854253
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Education
  • Before the Second World War, few universities in the United States had earned high respect among the international community of scholars and scientists. Since 1945, however, the distinctive attributes of American higher education—decentralized administration, pluralistic and research-minded faculties, and intense competition for government funding—have become world standard. Whether measured by Nobel and other prizes, international applications for student admissions and faculty appointments, or the results of academic surveys, America's top research universities are the best in the world. The Rise of American Research Universities provides a fresh historical interpretation of their ascendancy and a fresh, comprehensive estimate of their scholarly achievement. Hugh Davis Graham and Nancy Diamond question traditional methods of rating the reputation and performance of universities; they offer instead an empirical analysis of faculty productivity based on research grants received, published research, and peer approval of that work. Comparing the research achievements of faculty at more than 200 institutions, they differ with most studies of higher education in measuring performance in every academic field—from medicine to humanities—and in analyzing data on research activity in terms of institutional size. In this important and timely work, Graham and Diamond reassess the success of American universities as research institutions and the role of public funding in their developmentfrom the expansionist "golden years" of the 1950s and '60s, through the austerity measures of the 1970s and the entrepreneurial ethos of the 1980s, to the budget crises universities face in the 1990s.

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    The Remarkable, Rough-riding Life of Theodore Roosevelt and the Rise of Empire America
  • Author : N.a
  • Publisher : National Geographic Books
  • Pages : 150
  • ISBN : 1426300085
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Presents the life and accomplishment of the twenth-sixth president, in a period which saw the rise of the United States as a world power.

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    The Rise of American High School Sports and the Search for Control, 1880-1930
  • Author : Robert Pruter
  • Publisher : N.a
  • Pages : 417
  • ISBN : 0815633149
  • Reader Reviews :
  • Genre : Education
  • Nearly half of all American high school students participate in sports teams. With a total of 7.6 million participants as of 2008, this makes the high school sports program in America the largest organized sports program in the world. Pruter's work traces the history of high school sports from the student-led athletic clubs of the 1800s through to the establishment of educator control of high school sports under a national federation by the 1930s. Pruter's research serves not only to highlight this rich history but also to provide new perspectives on how high school sports became the arena by which Americans fought for some of the most contentious issues in society, such as race, immigration and Americanization, gender roles, religious conflict, the role of the military in democracy, and the commercial exploitation of our youth.